Correlating Socioeconomic Status to Stress Levels

Correlating Socioeconomic Status to Stress Levels

Today's post is authored by Social Construct Project Group Member Jack Palmer.

Stress is an everyday part of life. Despite appearing paradoxical, stress can be healthy while also teaching us how to handle life’s challenges. However, chronic high-levels of stress can become very harmful to nearly every aspect of a person’s life. Growing political debate and concern around the world regarding wealth disparity and healthcare reform, should prompt us to investigate how chronic socioeconomic related stress is affecting children who live in poverty.

“The future of any society depends on its ability to foster the healthy development of the next generation. Extensive research on the biology of stress now shows that healthy development can be derailed by excessive or prolonged activation of stress response systems in the body and the brain, with damaging effects on learning, behavior and health across the lifespan. Yet policies that affect young children do not address or even reflect awareness of the degree to which very early exposure to stressful experiences and environments can affect the architecture of the brain, the body’s stress response systems, and a host of outcomes later in life.” (National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2014)

America's Melting Pot and Associated Health Pathologies

America's Melting Pot and Associated Health Pathologies

Today's post is authored by Social Construct Project Group member, Abdelhakim Al-Maisari.

One of the hallmark characteristics of the United States is the homogenization of a plethora of cultures from across the world into one cohesive entity known as the melting pot. Such a social organization is imperative for a successful society in which people are able to better understand each other, work together, and stigmatizes discrimination.  Here in Detroit, we are fortunate enough to enjoy and appreciate these diverse ethnicities and cultures. Detroit alone is home to 688,000 people with backgrounds of French, Belgian, German, Hispanic, Polish, Greek, Middle Eastern, Bangladesh, and African American which enriches cultural traditions. With various types of ethnicities, different lifestyles are practiced by everyone. This includes physical activities, education, types of diets, psychological and social factors.

The Simple Truth

The Simple Truth

Today's post is authored by Social Construct Project Group member, Mustafa Edriss.

“A little white lie never hurt anyone.” How is it that these few words have such a powerful impact on our society? In today’s world, bending the truth has become a norm. Whether it’s to a friend, classmate, even a professor, it’s become a part of our daily lives. The definition of the word “truth” is described as, “the quality or state of being true.” Sounds simple right? If it’s so simple, why has it become such a prevalent thing to do the exact opposite?

So, what are the reasons for why people lie?  People lie to improve social stature, exempt credit from others and claim it for themselves, cover rather poor performances, conceal mistakes they have made, deflect blame, and to manipulate and control others. Regardless of why people decide to lie, the end result proves to be the same.

Impact of Religiosity on Health

Impact of Religiosity on Health

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Volunteer Coordinator, Abilash Varghese. 

Taking an introspective look into society, what can be construed is that religion plays an integral role in one’s life in many facet. Religion shapes an individual’s morals and values, affects perspective, and impacts how an individual interacts with others in society. Unfortunately, we see major religious clashes worldwide and vile hatred towards each other. This may be due to a lack of a fundamental understanding for other religions and how each religion plays a specific role in the life of its followers.  

Broadening Our Scope on Sexuality

Broadening Our Scope on Sexuality

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Outreach Coordinator, Michael Hadous. 

Since the beginning of time, the fertilization of human germ cells have led to determinant sexes and characteristics of the baby-to-be.  This “genetic switch” events the developmental fate, psychological challenges and social pressures that the individual will face in the real-world. Such a sudden step in the development of an ignorant fetus, but such a monumental impact on the development of an aware being.

An Analysis on Varying Opportunity

An Analysis on Varying Opportunity

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Outreach Coordinator, Michael Hadous.

Here at MedEq, we strive for the pursuit of a health care system in which everyone is able to gain readily available access to health care.  Unfortunately, social dogma has led to polarized socio-economical regulation in the public health industry.  For example, it is apparent and well-documented that African American women face higher levels of morbidity and mortality as opposed to European American women (Shulz). Deciphering such a complicated social dilemma can be daunting at the surface but we can analyze it by investigating a major contributor, ethnicity. To actualize the issue, a study-based survey was administered in Detroit by the East Side Village Health Worker Partnership under the auspices of the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center (URC). 

Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Health Care

Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Health Care

 

Today's blog post is authored by MedEq's Budget Committee Head, Johnny "The Boy" Stephan. 

Racial and social inequality serves as a great contributor to health disparities in the United States. Socioeconomic status is a combined total measure of education, income, and occupation that is compared in relation to that of others. Unfortunately, vast differences in socioeconomic status across different categories such as race and ethnic group have created social schisms along with unequal health care treatment. In a comprehensive report conducted in 2008 by the Center for Disease Control, it can be extrapolated that people of various ethnic groups or socioeconomic statuses are increasingly susceptible to specific health pathologies than others. 

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