Produce

Who has Access to Healthy Food Options?

Who has Access to Healthy Food Options?

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Co-Treasurer, Sabrina Pakula.

A common correlation we observe today is that poorer areas lack grocery stores that provide healthy, fresh produce to their consumers because of the low family incomes within the area. Due to the lack of promise, conglomerate food retailers deem it not profitable or in the interest of the company to invest in an area and bring dearly needed food to people. They also reason that their clientele will avoid purchasing fresh produce because it is more expensive than less healthier options. For decades now, the availability of fresh produce was specific to areas of color, and policies are just now being introduced to fairly locate food sources. The devastating truth is that this kind of information is either blurred through journals and unaccepted or viewed as a political strategy. As noted, “inequitable access to healthy food is a major contributor to health disparities” and if addressed can solve an assortment of problems such as obesity. 

Importance of Buying Produce Locally

Importance of Buying Produce Locally

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Volunteer Director, Kenia Espino. 

In today’s world of mass production, consumers expect their groceries to be affordable and easily accessible. With this system however, the quality of food products is comprimised and independent local markets are struggling for business. Supporting local food markets is crucial for the local economy and also promotes healthy living. The central benefit of buying locally grown produce and food is that you know where your food comes from. Often times, buying local food may even be more fiscal than buying from supermarkets. Locally grown produce and foods undergo very little processing, are more fresh, and are of higher quality.

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