Obesity

The Obesity Epidemic and its Effect on Detroit Residents

The Obesity Epidemic and its Effect on Detroit Residents

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Volunteer Coordinator, Dania Baraka.    

We currently live in a country where everything is revolved around time, money, and convenience. The common trend observed appears that the more we progress as a society, we tend to go backwards in a sense. As people spend more time pursuing quality employment and wealth, the quality of the food we consume and the amount of exercise partake in take a backseat in our daily lives. Obesity rates in America has skyrocketed in the past ten years, with the National Institute of Health reporting that more than 2 in every 3 adults are considered to be overweight or obese, and more than 1 in 3 adults are considered to be obese (1).  Although self-explanatory, overweight and obese individuals as defined by the WHO organization are individuals who have abnormal or excessive fat accumulations in their bodies that may impair health, with obesity defining individuals with more severe fat accumulations (2). Adults are classified overweight or obese by their body mass index, which is defined as a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of their height in meters. A BMI greater than or equal to 25 is overweight, a BMI greater than or equal to 30 is obese (2). While the BMI is a useful tool, it is not always accurate or reliable, especially when using it on kids.

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