Healthy Options

Urban Agriculture

Urban Agriculture

Today's post is authored by Food Disparities Project Group Chair, Dania Baraka.

Most of us come from the typical suburban setting: colonial house, two car garage, the white picket fence, and of course a beautiful, lush green backyard. Backyards do a lot for a family. Come the warmer months, the backyard is the place to be. Pool parties, get-togethers, a pick-up game of soccer are all wonderful activities done in backyards. With this being said however, there is much that can be done outside of the scope of leisure time. Many people use their backyards as a means of growing fresh fruits and vegetables, alongside the occasional hydrangea. It is safe to say that most families with backyards have at one point or another put their gardening skills to the test. Growing your own fruits and vegetables is a rewarding and relaxing pastime that many of us take up in the luxuries of our backyards. But what about those who really need the access fresh fruits and vegetables? Can they too, just as easily plant and grow their own food? Not necessarily.

Who has Access to Healthy Food Options?

Who has Access to Healthy Food Options?

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Co-Treasurer, Sabrina Pakula.

A common correlation we observe today is that poorer areas lack grocery stores that provide healthy, fresh produce to their consumers because of the low family incomes within the area. Due to the lack of promise, conglomerate food retailers deem it not profitable or in the interest of the company to invest in an area and bring dearly needed food to people. They also reason that their clientele will avoid purchasing fresh produce because it is more expensive than less healthier options. For decades now, the availability of fresh produce was specific to areas of color, and policies are just now being introduced to fairly locate food sources. The devastating truth is that this kind of information is either blurred through journals and unaccepted or viewed as a political strategy. As noted, “inequitable access to healthy food is a major contributor to health disparities” and if addressed can solve an assortment of problems such as obesity.