Flint

Understanding the Difficulty of Resolving the Flint Water Crisis

Understanding the Difficulty of Resolving the Flint Water Crisis

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Editor, Mohammed Turfe.

For the past couple of Environmental blog posts, I have righteously focused on the Flint Water Crisis and the dramatic aftermath. Labeled as one of the monumental public health crisis in the 21st century, the Flint Water Crisis is leaving it’s citizens without direct access to mankind’s greatest necessity. At least 15% of Flint residents have corrosive water that exceed the federal standard for lead concentrations, some house even exceeded the maximum by 900X. 

Thanks to a collaborative and warm-hearted effort by millions of community members from across the globe, millions of water bottles, filters, and other essentials are being distributed to those who need it most. With this being said however, this is merely a short-term patch to a long term conundrum. Flint citizens are no longer able to take hot showers and use bottled water to bathe. For this crisis to finally be resolved, the corrosive pipes that Flint’s water flows through need to be replaced. 

Addressing the Flint Water Crisis

Addressing the Flint Water Crisis

Today's post is authored by MedEq's editor, Mohammed Turfe.

Flint, Michigan serves as the largest City in Genesee County and the seventh largest city in the State of Michigan. It has a bad rep for being categorized amongst, “The Most Dangerous Cities in America” with a per capita crime rate that is seven times higher than the national average. What may be hidden about Flint, is that it is famous for the Flint Sit-Down Strike in 1936 which lead to the formation of the UAW. Moreover, it is home to the “Flintstones” who comprised the 2000 Michigan State Men’s Basketball team that won the National Championship.