Environment

Understanding the Difficulty of Resolving the Flint Water Crisis

Understanding the Difficulty of Resolving the Flint Water Crisis

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Editor, Mohammed Turfe.

For the past couple of Environmental blog posts, I have righteously focused on the Flint Water Crisis and the dramatic aftermath. Labeled as one of the monumental public health crisis in the 21st century, the Flint Water Crisis is leaving it’s citizens without direct access to mankind’s greatest necessity. At least 15% of Flint residents have corrosive water that exceed the federal standard for lead concentrations, some house even exceeded the maximum by 900X. 

Thanks to a collaborative and warm-hearted effort by millions of community members from across the globe, millions of water bottles, filters, and other essentials are being distributed to those who need it most. With this being said however, this is merely a short-term patch to a long term conundrum. Flint citizens are no longer able to take hot showers and use bottled water to bathe. For this crisis to finally be resolved, the corrosive pipes that Flint’s water flows through need to be replaced. 

Addressing the Flint Water Crisis

Addressing the Flint Water Crisis

Today's post is authored by MedEq's editor, Mohammed Turfe.

Flint, Michigan serves as the largest City in Genesee County and the seventh largest city in the State of Michigan. It has a bad rep for being categorized amongst, “The Most Dangerous Cities in America” with a per capita crime rate that is seven times higher than the national average. What may be hidden about Flint, is that it is famous for the Flint Sit-Down Strike in 1936 which lead to the formation of the UAW. Moreover, it is home to the “Flintstones” who comprised the 2000 Michigan State Men’s Basketball team that won the National Championship.

The Invasive Species Conundrum

The Invasive Species Conundrum

Today's post is authored by MedEq's Editor, Mohammed Turfe.

As we all are generally aware of, the conundrum associated with invasive species is intricate, problematic and devastating to native species. According to the National Wildlife Federation, invasive species account for 42% of threatened and endangered species. They are introduced to foreign environments in a plethora of methodologies such as buoyant waters, tides and the illegal trading of animals. Once displaced, invasive species deteriorate the ordered structure of the current ecosystem and turn it into disarray.

Importance of Maintaining Environmental Cleanliness via Rain Gardens

Importance of Maintaining Environmental Cleanliness via Rain Gardens

Today's post is authored by MedEq's editor, Mohammed Turfe. 

Flooding in the Metro Detroit area, and in the State of Michigan as a whole, is a prevalent issue that is negatively affecting our surrounding environment. Due to climate change and increased carbon emissions, there has been a steady rise in severe rainfall events over the past decade. Usually when it rains, the ground soaks up rain water which filters it and deposits it into aquifers which replenishes our ground water supply. Unfortunately, these humongous rainfall occurrences have yielded an overflow to a point where the ground is unable to soak up water. The same concept goes for sump pumps found in household basements which collects and drains unwanted water and prevents flooding. With this overflowing however, it can lead to malfunctions and overflows in the sump pumps which explains the substantial amount of baseman and overall flooding indecent years. Additionally, rainwater accumulates on impermeable surfaces such as roads and parking lots which is why there is flooding in neighborhoods and shopping areas. In fact, the flooding has become such a ubiquitous issue in Michigan that President Obama issued a disaster declaration for the State of Michigan in order to help with the estimated $1.1 million dollars in damages.  But where does this excess water go?

Environmental Consequences of the Motor City

Environmental Consequences of the Motor City

The following post is authored by Anthony Talocco, who serves as the Director of Communications for MedEq. 

As a growing society, we are constantly expanding technological limits to enhance the productivity and relative ease of our daily lives. As these innovations propagate themselves, a heavy priced is paid to the surrounding suburbs and communities to which these factories are located.  Dating to the 1950's, Detroit boomed as the epicenter of the automobile industry with over 1.8 million people citizens at the time. With such prowess in massive production came scarring of the land deteriorated the environmental well-being of the surrounding area. 

/* */